“holy shivers”

KFB FRIDAYS | THIS FRIDAY

dividedlinda frankross belot

                                                            …so beautiful

I wanted to capture you, pin you to me forever

Here’s the story.

I had just finished (and was blown away by) Linda Frank’s Dividedthat very same week poet Ross Belot comes in, introduces himself and I share this with him, he says, “O, I’m a good friend of Linda’s” (they both live in Hamilton) so I ask if he would pass along my praise and better still if we could book a reading. He messages her while still at the shop and I thought Sue Bracken would fit in nicely, and here we are.

LINDA FRANK | ROSS BELOT | SUE BRACKEN

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 16TH

knife | fork | book
at The Dark Side Studio | 244 Augusta Avenue | 2nd Floor | Kensington Market | Toronto

Doors 6:30 Poetry 7
Access: We are a second floor walk-up with two all-gender washrooms. Please remove your shoes upon entrance.
LINDA FRANK lives in Hamilton Ontario. She has four books of poetry, Cobalt Moon Embrace (BuschekBooks, 2002), Kahlo:The World Split Open (BuschekBooks, 2008) shortlisted for the Pat Lowther Award, and Insomnie Blues (BuschekBooks, 2011). Her latest is Divided (Wolsak & Wynn, 2018). She is a past winner of the Bliss Carman Award and has been short listed for the National Magazine Award.
ROSS BELOT is a poet, photographer, documentary filmmaker and an energy and climate change columnist. He previously worked for a major Canadian petroleum company for decades. Now he writes eco-poetics and diatribes about government climate change inaction. Ross was a finalist for the 2016 CBC Poetry Prize and his first collection, Swimming In The Dark, was published in 2008. His second collection, Nothing Bothers To Remain, was just accepted by Wolsak and Wynn for spring 2020 publication. In 2017, he completed an MFA at Saint Mary’s College of California. He frequently lives in Hamilton with his longtime cat companion, Vince.
SUE BRACKEN lives and works in Toronto / BUT / She often swims in Lake Kashagawigamog in Haliburton / Has cycled in Scotland / Worked as a Physiotherapist in London England / Enjoyed cheese fondue beside the North Saskatchewan River / Danced professionally on stage at Harbourfront / Earned her 1st degree black belt in shotokan karate / Currently lives in a forested and flowered house ruled by artists and animals. She is co-founder of the Mooneaters poetry group. Sue’s poetry and prose has appeared in The New Quarterly, Fresh Voices, Wegway Magazine, OCAP Anthology Eight, The Totally Unknown Writer’s Festival 2015: Stories, and a few chapbooks. Her debut collection of poetry When Centipedes Dream (Tightrope Books) was launched this past May. She is very happy about that.

Poets Night Out

jimhouse

 

There is nothing quite like an Anstruther Press launch to bring everybody out (even on the bleakest of days/nights). Congrats to poets ANDREW BROOKS JM FRANCHETEAU DAVID GROULX EMILY OSBOURNE and to the kickass team at Anstruther, Jim, Erica, Ally, Katie, Shane (and to Amy LeBlanc and John Barton, not pictured). Find their lovely chapbooks here.  knife | fork | book 

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KFB FRIDAYS | THIS FRIDAY

“What has annually become our most anticipated, biggest event of the season… and for good reason.” – Kirby

ANSTRUTHER PRESS FALL 2018 LAUNCH

ANDREW BROOKS ONE COUNTRY AFTER
JM FRANCHETEAU HEART & MOUTH & DEED & LIFE
DAVID GROULX  AM A SKIN TOO
EMILY OSBOURNE BIOMETRICAL

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 9TH

knife | fork | book
at The Dark Side Studio | 244 Augusta Avenue | 2nd Floor | Kensington Market | Toronto

Doors 6:30 Poetry 7
Access: We are a second floor walk-up with two all-gender washrooms. Please remove your shoes upon entrance.

There will also be copies of AMY LeBLANC‘s recently released Ladybird, Ladybird, and JOHN BARTON‘s new manifesto, Visible But Not Seen: Queer Expression in the Age of Equity.

ANDREW BROOKS is a freelance writer and editor who lives in the same Toronto as JM Francheteau. One Country After is his first book. Other than that, his poetry CV consists of a few magazine appearances in the early 80s; he returned to poetry about six years ago after spending a few decades thinking about it.
JM FRANCHETEAU lives in the Toronto that’s in Canada. He co-organizes the Toronto Zine Off and One-Off Reading events, and took his poetry on tour in 2015 with Worst Case Ontario and 2018 with GO Big Then GO Home. This is his third chapbook.
DAVID GROULX was raised in the Northern Ontario mining community of Elliot Lake. He is proud of his Native roots—his mother is Ojibwe and his father French Canadian. David studied creative writing at the En’owkin Centre, Penticton, BC, where he won the Simon J. Lucas Jr. Memorial Award for poetry. His latest book, The Wabigoon River Poems was nominated for the Archibald Lampman award in 2016. David’s poetry has appeared in over a hundred periodicals in England, Australia, Germany, Austria, and the USA. He lives in a log home near Ottawa.
EMILY OSBOURNE Osborne is the winner of The Malahat Review’s 2018 Far Horizon Award for Poetry. Her poetry has been published in CV2, The Literary Review of Canada, The Antigonish Review, Canthius, Minola Review, and elsewhere. She earned a PhD in Old Norse-Icelandic Literature from the University of Cambridge, and her full-length book of Norse poetry translations, Quarrel of Arrows, is forthcoming from Junction Books. Emily serves as a poetry editor for Pulp Literature. She lives with her husband Daniel Cowper on Bowen Island, BC.

“Splintered adjective, splintered light, splintered angel”

KFB | REVIEW
AN ABSENCE SO GREAT AND SPONTANEOUS IT IS EVIDENCE OF LIGHT  ANNE GORRICK
The Operating System, 2018

 

 

Raking knife|fork|book’s shelves for some experimental poetry I came across this little gem by Brooklyn’s The Operating System. I knew the moment I read the title, An Absence So Great and Spontaneous It Is Evidence of Light, it was a book I needed to take home.

Presenting friends with certain poems in “an Absence” without providing any context, they struggle to understand impenetrable words such as “brineshrimpdirect” or “Shantybisque.” I then like to share how every poem has been constructed.

The technological advances of the past couple decades have had a profound impact on how we interact with the world around us, and therefore how we consume and produce art. Search engines have come a long way since their humble beginnings. Google is now able to absorb the zeitgeist’s most discrete needs and reflect it back at us as eerily accurate predictions. These predictions, though computer generated and algorithmic, have been based on what the global soul has whispered into the search engine’s ears. In “An absence,” the poet ANNE GORRICK aims to synthesize these whispers as a poetic document.

“use this poem to generate random events like

Throwing up, falling asleep, losing weight

Stop breathing, you are a fortune cookie cliché”

Each poem in the book corresponds to a source poem that has been sifted through search engines and drop-down suggestion; some edited and some left whole. In the processual note of the book, Gorrick explains how the poetic “I” dissolves in the algorithmic desires of the zeitgeist, therefore expanding the poetic possibilities.

 

This book is belongs to the OS’s “PRINT / DOCUMENT” Imprint, which through publishing bold works such as “An Absence”, aims to showcase the power of the page in the age of digital media. As Gorrick points out in an interview with the publisher, “The electronic zeitgeist changes constantly, like a river. I’m riveted by the temporality of this unrepeatable experiment”; hence This book is a document, a piece of evidence to capture the electronic zeitgeist at the time of the experiment, perhaps one that can be studied in the years to come in to further develop our understanding of the time it was written.

“an unfinished husband, you are an oasis in collapse

Islands strung like chapter summaries, an idle stroll

Sometimes her flesh lived in the fun lane

A god

A check

A man

A grant

A Chevrolet

The forbidden fortunes in western wear

You have been closed

You were selected but not displayed

You became the formalist portal of god

You contained validation errors”

Gorrick hopes for this book to be a big middle finger to capitalism, which she believes has left poetry alone. On the subject of capitalism and poetry she states: “its about as contrarian as you can get right now to spend time on something that has essentially no efficient return, very little monetary transactionality.” But don’t let her anti-capitalist discourse dissuade you from buying her book.

this poem might be a transient madness toward advanced mathematics

This poem might be a transfer in heat between particles of a substance”

Gorrick mentions how she enjoys the materiality of paper, since it “contains light” and how the very title of the book can be a great description for both her mother and the internet.

In this grid of recycled words and light

Taxidermied tessellations

Time machine, the clear button, the web to draw in crowds”

This book is a mirror frozen in time; a look at the global soul through electronic inquiries, a document to which we’re all witnesses, so great and spontaneous it is evidence of light. 

“Is this poem an event that decreases the behaviour that precedes it?

Event mining, the mimic octopus

This sentence is camouflaged in adaptation

Presocial and post-colonial, mockery and hybridity

Darkness symbolled in lyric, her sadness splitscreen

Splice comma splice, sunlight in miniature

Splintered adjective, splintered light, splintered angel”

KHASHAYAR MOHAMMADI IS AN IRANIAN-BORN WRITER/TRANSLATOR BASED IN TORONTO, CURRENTLY AN EDITOR AT INSPIRITUS PRESS. THEIR MOST RECENT PUBLICATION IS MOE’S SKIN (ZED PRESS, 2018). DEAR KESTREL IS BEING PUBLISHED BY KNIFE | FORK | BOOK SPRING 2019.